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osCommerce

The e-commerce.

Full CSS/XHTML Support (OR: Tables? Only when it's tabular data!)


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Hi guys

 

Fantastic idea this oscommerce, gives lots of indie developers the chance to make more expensive sites, which is ace!

 

One thing though - the site design is pretty much according to no web design guidelines anywhere (except possibly Dreamweaver's). It's all a morass of tables for layout, which is never fun for customisation. See the CSS Zen Garden for how to make a site which has easily customisable design.

 

Any efforts to convert to this would be so appreciated, thanks!

 

Cheers guys

 

Rob

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Hi guys

 

Fantastic idea this oscommerce, gives lots of indie developers the chance to make more expensive sites, which is ace!

 

One thing though - the site design is pretty much according to no web design guidelines anywhere (except possibly Dreamweaver's). It's all a morass of tables for layout, which is never fun for customisation. See the CSS Zen Garden for how to make a site which has easily customisable design.

 

Any efforts to convert to this would be so appreciated, thanks!

 

Cheers guys

 

Rob

 

Not quite there , but bringing MS2.2 a bit closer: valid XHTML Catalog Side 2.3

 

 

Next version MS3 will feature xhtml and css design, Read more here....

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That's cool man, glad to see something's happening!

 

Dividing up the content into divs with classes and ids though, that's where the good stuff starts, and opens it up to some awesome possibilities.

 

Incidentally, I don't suppose there's a list of the php calls oscommerce uses, so that the rest of us can try and build a site with good xhtml structure and semantic markup, and just add in the (no doubt many) php calls in the relevent places?

 

If this involves trawling through the source, fair enough> Just wondered if there might be a shortcut.

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Or here's a thought. Divide up the application so that each aspect of the page (specials list, breadcrumbs, items currently being displayed, whatever) can be accessed through a simple php call. For example, if I wanted the list of items of special offer, I would insert this into my code:

 

<?php getspecials(); ?>

 

And it would return an unordered list, with each element being a link to the correct item. Then, if one's code was something like this:

 

<div class="headings" id="specials">
<h2>special offers</h2>
<?php getspecials(); ?>
</div>

 

It would be so easy to style this. Repeat this for every other item, and you have an ecommerce package that is designed for website makers, rather than a package which developers can hack together with trial-and-error.

 

Even the main items (displayed usually in the centre; the things on sale) could be received from a php call; they could simply be a string of divs, which are then easily styled.

 

Take a look here, at the source (the styling is naff I know...10 minutes' work!). That's what I'd hope to end up with once the php had executed. Simple, easily styled elements which will simply work and which are semantically accurate (I know, calling a div "right" isn't useful, but it's just an example!).

 

What do you guys think? Did that make sense?

 

Rob

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