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osCommerce

The e-commerce.

Website Speed Test Tool


Jud

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I have put a tool online that will benefit the osCommerce community, it is a website speed test.

 

It will allow you to get a general sense of your websites speed. This utility is hosted on a dedicated server (which I also run my shop on), so the speeds that you are seeing are not YOUR speeds, but the webservers speeds.

 

It also calculates the throughput to our website and how many pages you can serve up per minute, hour, day and month.

 

I hope that this benefits someone. If my website (or someone elses website) is running slow, I like to go and test their speed to see if it is my connection or their website. I don't know what all it could be used for, but I hope someone like it :D.

 

If you find any bugs be sure to tell me :) ...

 

The website is Jucodev.com

 

Jud

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Fascinating. I like it.

 

How it does arrive at those figures? I noticed that no matter what site I pointed it at, it always reports 2-3KB downloaded.

Rule #1: Without exception, backup your database and files before making any changes to your files or database.

Rule #2: Make sure there are no exceptions to Rule #1.

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Right now it does not take into account the filesizes of the images in the file. This is probably what is causing it to report 2-3k filesizes. I am working on getting image sizes into the report :) ...

 

Jud

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You can always go to

http://www.websiteoptimization.com/services/analyze/

or several other sites you can find if you do a search if you want to check your sites loading.

 

I really like some of the stuff that that website has to offer. I will definantly integrate some of its features into the benchmark :) ...

 

Thanks for the input wendyjames,

 

 

Jud

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No problem Jud. =) Great what google can come up with when you take the time to look. lol I never bothered to check mine before today and probably wouldn't have if I hadn't seen your post.

 

There are a ton of great sites out there for checking speed, and optimising code (although there isnt much you can do with oscs pages, really) and so on. Which you probably already know. =) Those kinds of sites I use regularly when creating regular html bases sites.

Wendy James

 

Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.

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Wendy, thank you for that link. One thing it told me that I had not thought about was that the Urchin Tracking Module adds a 21KB burden on the page load. Most of my target audience is on broadband, but I am going to have to consider whether the data is worth potentially driving off dialup shoppers.

 

Similarly, the JavaScript for the live support feature adds a 25KB burden on it.

 

Something I don't guess I understand is how a few lines of JavaScript packs as much KB as the HTML for the whole rest of the page. Is it that the analyzer is counting the size after the browser interpreter processes the JS? In that case it doesn't really have that impact on download burden.

 

Jud, as you are further enhancing your analyzer, this would be an interesting aspect to look into. Actual download KB/download speed vs. browser load (download + interpreted JS, decompression of gz compressed content, etc.). I'm not sure how feasible this latter part is since in the real world it would depend on the user's system. But maybe it could be a benchmark based on a specific defined system, more for relative comparison of page designs than actual user results.

Rule #1: Without exception, backup your database and files before making any changes to your files or database.

Rule #2: Make sure there are no exceptions to Rule #1.

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It's amazing what little things added to your site can cause considerable delay in a page loading. Look at the cool menu (dhtml) menu. It's nothing major but it alone took twice as long to load as any of the content on my pages did, including the pages that had 20 product thumbnails. To navigate you would have to sit and wait a good 5-10 seconds after the pages had loaded in for the links to load in. Which really stinks because I liked the way it looked but I had to ditch it. If it was annoying me, then I know it would be bugging others.

 

Same with the info boxes with scrolling stuff in them. So many people don't realise that every image has to load for those to work which means slow loading time. I had one on my site for a while and just removed the images which made a big difference.

 

I normally just look at how long it takes a page to load for me and if it's slow I tweek the page. I am on cable and if it's slow for me it must be killer for dial up and lots of people still use dial up. The town I used to live in won't be getting cable or DSL for atleast 4 more years. Gotta love the hick towns. But I think a lot of people forget the fact there are still dial up users and will be for some time to come. Kind of the same deal with people forgetting that lots still browse on the 800x600 settings. lol

Wendy James

 

Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.

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