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Best pic quality w performance


Peter@20ghz

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Ok.

 

Im not a photographer, i know some and have made nice pics of faces and landscapes :-)

 

But shooting product pics for web is not easy.

i feel that i need som tips here.

 

Objects, handbags, accesories, nig nags and some bling blings

For the popup i need them big enough that you can see the details. on the net, you sell with the pics, not the arguments. so they have to be good

 

My camera. minolta dimage A2 8mpix 28-200 zoom built in flash, no external flash, have a tripod.

 

I cannot make pics to "big" since it will take forever to download them and server space at webhost will be full to soon.

 

Make them big and then shrink in photoshop often makes it look very weird.

 

Any one that have tips on best way to take the pics? was thinking maybe 300*300 pixels in sice

It will probably be a new day tomorrow.

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You want to start out with the highest resolution possible, then make adjustments in Photoshop, then resize for the web (save for web option). Make sure you save your final image in the high resolution format, that way you can re-use it if you want to later make promotional things such as product brochures. I have never had a problem with Photoshop resizing, the resized images always look very good.

 

A good place to learn about lighting for internet products is at Web Photo School. Check out the car lesson. Lighting is very important in photographing, you need to know what kind of light you are using and set your camera for that, otherwise you end up with too much blue or red in the picture. I recently purchased Photoflex Starlight Basic lighting kit and it works well for photographing small products.

 

Good luck! :)

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Thanks for a good answer.

I might have done it wrong somehow.

My resolutions i can use are

3264 x 2448, 3264 x 2176 (3:2), 2560 x 1920, 2080 x 1560, 1600 x 1200, 640 x 480

JPEG, TIFF, Motion JPEG (MOV), RAW, WAVE, DCF 1.0-, DPOF-kompatibel, Exif 2.21

 

And when i have taken for example a picture 3264x2448 and then save it down to 300x300 it kinda looks weird.

Allso i can say that what im trying to do aswell is to have it composed in the way that the object with shadow,

takes up 90% of the picture since i dont want to have to crop all pics later.

But maybe i just have to find some adjustments in photoshop that might help.

 

And i will most definetly look in to the web photo school you linked to.

 

Any more tips are most appriciated.

And for moderators, im sorry,, just saw that i posted this one in wrong part of the forum, was ment to be posted in tips and trix.

 

Regards

Peter

It will probably be a new day tomorrow.

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Thanks for a good answer.

I might have done it wrong somehow.

My resolutions i can use are

3264 x 2448, 3264 x 2176 (3:2), 2560 x 1920, 2080 x 1560, 1600 x 1200, 640 x 480

JPEG, TIFF, Motion JPEG (MOV), RAW, WAVE, DCF 1.0-, DPOF-kompatibel, Exif 2.21

 

And when i have taken for example a picture 3264x2448 and then save it down to 300x300 it kinda looks weird.

Allso i can say that what im trying to do aswell is to have it composed in the way that the object with shadow,

takes up 90% of the picture since i dont want to have to crop all pics later.

But maybe i just have to find some adjustments in photoshop that might help.

 

And i will most definetly look in to the web photo school you linked to.

 

Any more tips are most appriciated.

And for moderators, im sorry,, just saw that i posted this one in wrong part of the forum, was ment to be posted in tips and trix.

 

Regards

Peter

 

Can you post an example of what you mean by weird? If possible, post the large and the small images. I use Gimp and scaling images down looks good, often better when they're smaller. I could try scaling a large one down for you and seeing if it looks weird to you or not.

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Are you taking them in TIF format? JPEG has lots of compression which will make your picture look weird since it takes approximations of close colors. Take the pictures in TIF format, don't worry about getting the object framed just right in your picture, use the crop feature of Photoshop for this.

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Yes. ive been using JPEG 2080x1560 those pic files ends up at aprox. 3mb

Then after i have adjusted some layers, contrast etc. i shrink it from 2080x1560 to 300xsomething.

And where i have been able to see for example beads or pearls individually on a bling bling, its now just like one big fuzzy distorted lump.

( i hope you understand how i mean)

So Tiff should be better to start with?

 

I will try tonight (swedish time) to post a before and after pic.

Ill actually have two bad afterpics on my dummy site the only two pics there is actually. And when you press the imgae to get it large will be the actuall size.

 

But i will try to post before and after pics tonight.

 

//Peter

It will probably be a new day tomorrow.

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Ok.

I will here show an example of before and after shrinkin pics.

I have in my hands a potent camera, and its to me quite expensive, payed for it here in sweden around $900usd so i dont think the camera is the problem.

I know i have seen small pics on detailed products much more crisp and detailed than mine are. So it must be me that do it wrong.

 

The big picture is ofcourse not great to start with.. BUT you can se detailes in all the small diferent shiny bits. But on the small pic its kinda just goes together in a blur. A picture like that cant sell,, which means no money, and then no honey :'(

BIG

small

 

How do you guys do it?

 

//Peter

It will probably be a new day tomorrow.

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Well, I think this has a lot to do with the quality of camera you use, and also, the red background isn't too hot. I'd get something white or grey or black, depending on the color of your product. Something neutral... There are these cool little foldout thingies that you can get to help with that sort of thing. I can't remember what they are supposed to be called, but they help soften the light and provide a decent backdrop for small items.

 

As far as what format to use, I *do* recommend JPG. But know what you're doing and use a good tool like Gimp or Photoshop so you have control over the compression, file size, and look of the image. It's something to consider, but I don't think it's your problem in this case. However, when working on your source images, it's better to have a non-lossy format to start with and through the editing process. Only compress when needed, usually the last step.

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Are you sure you are focusing correctly on the subject? Some of them look a little out of focus to begin with.

 

The small images you show are consistent with the larger ones, meaning only normal clearity was lost and nothing out of the norm.

 

Couple things to try:

 

1) Make sure you have don't have "soft" sharpening set on your camera. Instead use "Normal". Don't use "High".

 

2) Use a higher F stop like F8 so that you get all of the product in focus.

 

3) Use a tripod.

 

4) Use a lightbox to evenly light the product. You can find websites that show you how to make a light box for about $10.00.

 

OsCommerce:

 

1) Decide on a pixel demension in the Admin setup. Example for the thumbnails I use on my site, they are 200 x 160.

 

Photoshop:

 

1) Crop the photo using the aspect ratio you choose above. Example, 200 x 160 is an 8 x 10 aspect ratio. The crop tool will allow you to set it so that it's "ratio" remains constant.

 

2) Make your normal image adjustments, Levels, Curves, Contrast, etc.

 

3) Use Image>Resize and set the DPI to 72. Click OK to save.

 

4) Use Image>Resize to shrink the photo down to the size of you will allow for your "Enlarged" pictures. Example, if your thumbnails are 200 x 160, then your large photos may be 400 x 360. The idea is that you want something with the same "ratio" as your thumbnails. So in the Width box, type in 400. The other setting (Height) should adjust to 360 automatically. OK to save.

 

4) Now use Unsharp Mask to sharpen the image to your liking.

 

5) Now click Save For The Web. Don't just click Save or you will ruin your original - Use Save for Web. Now make sure "jpeg" is selected and save the image at about 60% quaility to a different folder.

 

6) Upload the small images to your website and see how they look!!

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